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General Ultrasound

Our team has been at the forefront of medical ultrasound (also known as sonography or ultrasonography) for many years, and so it is no surprise that we offer a complete range of ultrasound tests that include extra-cranial vascular, peripheral arterial, peripheral venous, echocardiography, and aortic vascular ultrasound. Our team has been performing ultrasounds for 10 years. All of our technicians are trained and supervised by Dr. Sanjoy Kundu, who is known worldwide for his training protocols and lectures on the techniques and most recent advancements in the treatment of vascular conditions (for example, Endovenous Laser Ablation for varicose veins and the latest treatment techniques for spider veins).

Ultrasound imaging is non-invasive, and does not use ionizing radiation or any radioactive substance. Ultrasound images show movement and blood flow, not merely static images of internal organs.

To expedite patient care, all imaging reports and images are stored and available within 24 hours on a web-based electronic digital PACS platform for physicians to review in their offices.

We perform many types of ultrasounds (including these general types, plus vascular and musculoskeletal types).

 

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Abdomen

Your doctor may request an abdominal ultrasound for any of a number of reasons (mainly to diagnose, identify, or examine kidney, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen, and the abdominal aorta):

  • abdominal pain or distention
  • gall stones (gallbladder stones)
  • abnormal liver function
  • enlarged abdominal organ
  • kidney stones
  • aortal aneurysm.

 

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Breast

Your doctor may request a breast ultrasound for any of a number of reasons:

  • to examine the internal structures of the breast
  • to diagnose or determine the nature of an abnormality (for example, a bloody or spontaneous discharge)
  • to characterize potential abnormalities from an MRI or mammography
  • to distinguish a non-cancerous lump from a potentially cancerous tumor
  • to distinguish a solid lump from a fluid-filled one; for example, a benign cyst is fluid-filled; a lump can be both cystic and solid
  • to examine the area surrounding an abnormality for other features that can assist in diagnosing
  • for supplemental breast cancer screening
  • for a breast biopsy.

For a breast ultrasound, we will ask you to undress from the waist up. We will provide you with a gown to wear.

 

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Gynecologic/Obstetric

Your doctor may request an ultrasound for any of a number of reasons:

  • to examine the uterus and ovaries
  • to inspect the cervix (mouth of the womb) for opening or shortening
  • to identify multiple pregnancies
  • to establish the presence of a living fetus or embryo
  • to identify the position of the placenta or the fetus
  • to asses fetal growth and/or well being.

For this type of ultrasound, it is best that you wear a two-piece outfit. We will provide you with a grown to wear. Your physician will tell you whether to arrive here for with a full bladder.

 

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Scrotum

Your doctor may request a scrotal ultrasound for any of a number of reasons:

  • to inspect the prostate, the epididymis (a sperm-collecting tube), the testicles, and surrounding tissue
  • to determine the cause of pain (sudden pain can indicate epididymitis, which becomes more serious if left untreated)
  • to determine the cause of swelling (for example, torsion or inflammation)
  • to locate undescended testis or testes
  • to diagnose the effects of trauma to the region
  • to determine the cause of infertility (for example, varicocele)
  • to distinguish a solid lump from a fluid-filled one; for example, a benign cyst is fluid-filled; a lump can be both cystic and solid.

 

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Thyroid Gland

The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system (it is one of nine endocrine glands that produce hormones and send them into the blood stream). Located in the front of the neck (just below the "Adam's apple") your doctor may request a thyroid ultrasound to inspect the thyroid gland for:

  • a lump
  • to determine the functioning of the gland.

 

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Ultrasound guided Breast Biopsy

  • Procedure done by doctor, assisted by ultrasound technicians takes about 30 minutes to one hour.
  • A biopsy is conducted when an ultrasound shows a suspicious solid mass, a distortion in the structure of the breast tissue, an area of abnormal tissue change.
  • This procedure involves the removal of breast tissue to examine under a microscope.
  • There are several different types of breast biopsies, including stereotactic, open, and lumpectomy.
  • You are awake during this procedure. The area is first cleaned. A doctor makes a very small cut on your breasts over the area that needs to be biopsied. An ultrasound machine is used to guide the needle. Several biopsies may be taken. A small metal clip or needle may be placed into the breast in the areas of the biopsy to mark it.
  • Some unlikely risks include bleeding/bruising, adverse medication reaction, infection, and inability to collect a sufficient size sample.

Preparation:

  • Do no take aspirin or any blood thinners for three days before your procedure.
  • With general anesthesia, you may be asked to not eat or drink anything for 8 to 12 hours before the test.

 

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Ultrasound guided Thyroid Biopsy

  • Procedure done by doctor, assisted by ultrasound technicians takes about 30 minutes to one hour.
  • A small sample of tissue is removed from the thyroid gland and tested in a laboratory.
  • You are awake during this procedure. The area is first cleaned. A doctor makes a very small cut over the area that needs to be biopsied. An ultrasound machine is used to guide the needle. Several biopsies may be taken. A small metal clip or needle may be placed in the areas of the biopsy that need to be marked.
  • This procedure is used to determine the cause of a nodule/lump or goiter in the thyroid gland. A biopsy is used to determine whether the nodule is benign or malignant.¬†
  • An ultrasound is more predictive of malignancy than nodule size alone.
  • Some unlikely risks include bleeding/bruising, adverse medication reaction, infection, and inability to collect a sufficient size sample.

Preparation:

  • Do no take aspirin or any blood thinners for three days before your procedure.
  • With general anesthesia, you may be asked to not eat or drink anything for 8 to 12 hours before the test.

 

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3D Women's pelvic ultrasound

  • Examines the female pelvic organs including the uterus, the endometrium, the cervix and the ovaries.
  • Uses Transabdominal (overview) and transvaginal approaches¬†
  • Transabdominal approach: scans lower abdomen. Provides an overview of the pelvis rather than detailed images. A small amount of gel is placed on the skin of the lower abdomen. A probe is then used on the gel to produce images.
  • Transvaginal approach: Internal ultrasound. The ultrasound probe is inserted in the vagina. Can produce clearer pictures due to greater proximity of the structures. The probe is about 2 cm in diameter and is covered with a disposable protective sheath.
  • A pelvic ultrasound can be useful to examine problems such as heavy or painful periods, pelvic pain during intercourse, infertility, irregular or infrequent periods, and postmenopausal bleeding.
  • A thorough evaluation of the uterus can facilitate in the evaluation of endometrial polyps (benign growths of the lining of the uterus), uterine fibroids (benign tumours of the muscle of the uterus) or for misplaced intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD).

Preparation:

  • Partially filled bladder, drink water prior to the assessment. Empty your bladder 1 hour before your appointment and drink 2 glasses of water afterwards. Do not empty your bladder again.
  • Your bladder should not be so full that it causes pain, if your bladder is very full and painful, you should empty a small amount so you are more comfortable.

 

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Salivary Gland

Your doctor may request an ultrasound of the salivary gland(s) for any of a number of reasons:

  • to examine inflammation, especially if acute
  • to diagnose disease of the salivary glands (for example, sialosis, sialolithiasis, cysts, adenomas).

 

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Small Parts

Your doctor may request an ultrasound of any part of the body, sometimes referred to as "small parts ultrasound", and may include thyroid, salivary gland, neck, scrotum, lumps and bumps, or any part of the body that your doctor would like to see in detail.

 

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